Should your next home be a project?

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The way people are approaching housing is changing quickly. A UK-wide lack of quality, affordable homes has forced people to think outside the box when thinking about accommodation.

Finding a house that is right for you is hard enough, but when you add into the mix other considerations such as location and cost it can become a seemingly impossible task. More and more people are taking matters into their own hands and getting creative with a self-build, extensions or building conversion projects.

Self-build

A self-build can be ideal if you’re struggling to find the ideal property and have a particular area in mind where you want to live. Instead of continuing on the house search it might be time to begin searching the market for plots of land to build on.

Alternatively, if you are lucky enough to already own land that would lend itself to a self-build site, this can be a great way of creating your perfect home from scratch, as opposed to trying to find the qualities you want in a pre-existing property.

Self-build projects can take patience and can at times it can be a difficult process, but the end result often more than justifies the means. However, if you’re not experienced with self-build projects, when looking for a potential site for your new home, it can be hard to know exactly what to look for. Fibre Architects offers a free, no obligation evaluation of plots of land to advise on their suitability for self-builds and on what type of properties would be suitable for them.

New government regulations have made it easier to get a self-build underway, just read our blog here for more info.

Conversions      

Lack of housing has lead to a rise in people turning to the conversion of old commercial properties into accommodation. Factories have become flats and warehouses have been split into homes. These kind of projects can provide additional character to your property with exposed brick and trendy, deliberately industrial interior design.

If you’re brave enough to take on a project of this kind, the reward can be great. Check out the market for some commercial properties if you fancy getting stuck into something a bit different, with the potential to make it your own. Again, Fibre Architects would be happy to review any potential sites and evaluate their scope for conversion into a domestic space.

Extensions

If you find a property that’s in the right location, but has a lack of space, the best idea may be to move into a smaller property and add an extension to it. We have seen an increasing number of people opting to extend smaller homes due to a lack of properties the right size in the area buyers want.

In a market where the choice for housing is coming increasing scarce, it’s important to explore all options for securing your perfect home. If you have a project in mind, and want advice from experienced and creative architects, Fibre Architects is here to help.

Home extension – a beginner’s guide

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It is common knowledge that if your home has a lack of space you need, it can often be less hassle and cost simply to build an extension to your property, rather than moving home. However, obviously there are some important considerations involved when thinking about extending your home, including some that might not immediately spring to mind, such as:

– car access;

– soil conditions on the site;

– services;

– surrounding trees

– any history of flooding;

– right of way

Once these are out of the way, naturally questions turn to cost. So exactly how much will a home extension set you back?

Cost

Figures vary hugely due to a variety of factors, such as location or design specification, but as a rule of thumb it is said you should allow around £1,000 – £2,000 m². Remember to balance the amount you are willing to spend on your extension with the estimated value it will add to your home.

In an ideal world we would all finance our projects using savings, however, if you need to borrow the money for an extension it is possible to finance them using a credit card, loan or by re-mortgaging your home. Each of these options has its own individual benefits. If in doubt, arrange a meeting with your bank to discuss your options and ask for advice.

Planning permission

Another thing to think about is the issue of planning permission, will your extension adhere to planning regulations? If you have an idea for a project, here are just a few aspects of planning you may want to consider before the design stage

– You can extend a detached dwelling by 8m to the rear if it’s single storey or 3m if it’s double.

– It must be built in the same or similar material to the existing dwelling.

– Extensions must not go forward of the building line of the original dwelling.

– Side extensions must be single storey, maximum height of 4m and a width no more than half of the original building.

– An extension must not result in more than half the garden being covered.

Design

The next step is where Fibre comes in. After considering and overcoming all of these practical considerations, it’s time to think about design. Choosing an architect that you have confidence in and that shares your values is so important.

At Fibre Architects, we’re passionate about providing high-quality home design that often does something a little bit different and has some creative flair, and we love working with clients who share that passion. With over 20 years’ experience designing residential extensions, we help make the process of helping create an extension you can be proud of run as smoothly as possible.

If you’re thinking about extending your home and think Fibre Architects is the right company for your project – get in touch!

(data and article source: https://www.homebuilding.co.uk/extension-beginners-guide/)